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EDP Renewables 2013 Annual Report

Human Rights

EDPR became a signatory to the UN Global Compact, an initiative of the United Nations launched in 2000 that defines guideline directives for businesses that opt to contribute to sustainable development.

EDPR also has a Code of Ethics that contains specific clauses for the respect for human rights. In compliance with the Code, EDPR expresses its total opposition to forced or compulsory labour and recognizes that human rights should be considered fundamental and universal, based on conventions, treaties and international initiatives like the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the International Labour Organization and the UN Global Compact.

Our Procurement Manual also includes a chapter that guides each Purchasing Department to put these principles into practice, therefore when procuring and contracting goods and services EDPR appeals to all reasonable endeavours so that selected suppliers accept to comply with the UN Global Compact’s ten principles in the areas of human rights, labour, the environment and anti-corruption.

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HR1 – PERCENTAGE AND TOTAL NUMBER OF SIGNIFICANT INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS THAT INCLUDE HUMAN RIGHTS CLAUSES OR THAT HAVE UNDERGONE HUMAN RIGHTS SCREENING.

EDPR has a Code of Ethics that contains specific clauses for the respect for human rights. Our Procurement Manual also includes a chapter to put the UN Global Compact principles into practice.

HR2 – PERCENTAGE OF SIGNIFICANT SUPPLIERS AND CONTRACTORS THAT HAVE UNDERGONE SCREENING ON HUMAN RIGHTS AND ACTIONS TAKEN.

EDPR has a Code of Ethics that contains specific clauses for the respect for human rights. Our Procurement Manual also includes a chapter to put the UN Global Compact principles into practice.

When procuring and contracting goods and services, EDPR appeals to all reasonable endeavours so that the selected suppliers accept to comply with the UN Global Compact’s ten principles.

However, as the business culture in the countries in which we operate is entirely respectful of human rights, the company has not undergone specific human rights screening of suppliers or contractors.

HR3 – TOTAL HOURS OF EMPLOYEE TRAINING ON POLICIES AND PROCEDURES CONCERNING ASPECTS OF HUMAN RIGHTS THAT ARE RELEVANT TO OPERATIONS, INCLUDING THE PERCENTAGE OF EMPLOYEES TRAINED.

In 2011, EDPR started an Ethics training program in Europe for all country managers, directors and senior managers with a team, holding a double objective:

  • To enhance EDPR’s ethical process and all the tools and documents available in the company
  • To prepare them to give ethics training to their teams.

Each manager was responsible for providing training to his/her team during the first quarter of 2012.

HR4 – TOTAL NUMBER OF INCIDENTS OF DISCRIMINATION AND ACTIONS TAKEN.

In 2013, EDPR did not record any incidents of discrimination.

HR5 – OPERATIONS IDENTIFIED IN WHICH THE RIGHT TO EXERCISE FREEDOM OF ASSOCIATION AND COLLECTIVE BARGAINING MAY BE AT SIGNIFICANT RISK, AND ACTIONS TAKEN TO SUPPORT THESE RIGHTS.

EDPR’s Code of Ethics has specific clauses concerning the right to exercise freedom of association. The company has no knowledge of any activity carried out that could jeopardize the right of freedom of association or the right to adhere to collective bargaining agreements.

HR6 – OPERATIONS IDENTIFIED AS HAVING SIGNIFICANT RISK FOR INCIDENTS OF CHILD LABOUR, AND MEASURES TAKEN TO CONTRIBUTE TO THE ELIMINATION OF CHILD LABOUR.

EDPR’s Code of Ethics has specific clauses against child or forced labour. The company did not identify any operation that could have a significant risk for incidents of child labour, forced and compulsory labour or indigenous rights.

HR7 – OPERATIONS IDENTIFIED AS HAVING SIGNIFICANT RISK FOR INCIDENTS OF FORCED OR COMPULSORY LABOUR, AND MEASURES TO CONTRIBUTE TO THE ELIMINATION OF FORCED OR COMPULSORY LABOUR.

EDPR’s Code of Ethics has specific clauses against child or forced labour. The company did not identify any operation that could have a significant risk for incidents of forced and compulsory labour or indigenous rights.

HR9 – TOTAL NUMBER OF INCIDENTS OF VIOLATIONS INVOLVING RIGHTS OF INDIGENOUS PEOPLE AND ACTIONS TAKEN.

EDPR did not identify any operation that could have a significant risk for incidents with indigenous rights.

HR10 – PERCENTAGE AND TOTAL NUMBER OF OPERATIONS THAT HAVE BEEN SUBJECT TO HUMAN RIGHTS REVIEWS AND/OR IMPACT ASSESSMENTS.

EDPR has more than 200 renewable plants in operation and is present in 11 countries, all of which are within the scope of the Code of Ethics premises and regulation.

HR11 – NUMBER OF GRIEVANCES RELATED TO HUMAN RIGHTS FILED, ADDRESSED, AND RESOLVED THROUGH FORMAL GRIEVANCE MECHANISMS.