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EDP Renewables 2013 Annual Report

Environmental Performance Part I

EDPR is strongly committed to protecting the environment and biodiversity through a proactive environmental management of its operational wind farms, as is stated in our Environmental and Biodiversity policies (detailed information available at www.edpr.com).

Our environmental strategy focuses on three core aspects: legal compliance, management of environmental risks and continuous improvement. Numerous environmental appraisal and monitoring procedures are incorporated in all phases of the business processes ensuring that these central pillars are enforced.

This is sustained by a qualified team that is aligned with the environmental strategy of the company. Both, our environmental specialists and the network of external partners working with us, stand out for their extensive professional experience and knowledge of the environmental field.

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EN4 – INDIRECT ENERGY CONSUMPTION BY PRIMARY SOURCE.

Wind turbines require a small amount of electricity to operate. This energy consumption is generally self-consumed. Given the intermittency of wind generation we sometimes need to consume electricity from the grid. The indirect CO2 emissions related to the consumed electricity is around 0.14% of the emissions avoided by the company.

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EN7 – INITIATIVES TO REDUCE INDIRECT ENERGY CONSUMPTION AND REDUCTIONS ACHIEVED.

Our activity is based on clean energy generation, and we produce about 350,500 times the electricity we consume. However, we are conscious about promoting a culture of rational use of resources and we promote many internal campaigns to promote sustainable behaviours as is explained in the following pages.

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EN8 – TOTAL WATER WITHDRAWAL BY SOURCE.

Generation from wind energy does not consume water in its operational processes. The water is consumed only for human use. The consumption of water per GWh generated accounts for 0.46 litres/GWh. Even so, the company actively seeks to adopt more eco-efficient practices. An example of this is that in 2013 seven substations installed rain water collection and treatment systems to cover their own water supply needs.

EN11 – LOCATION AND SIZE OF LAND OWNED, LEASED, MANAGED IN, OR ADJACENT TO, PROTECTED AREAS AND AREAS OF HIGH BIODIVERSITY VALUE OUTSIDE PROTECTED AREAS.

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EN12 – DESCRIPTION OF SIGNIFICANT IMPACTS OF ACTIVITIES, PRODUCTS, AND SERVICES ON BIODIVERSITY IN PROTECTED AREAS AND AREAS OF HIGH BIODIVERSITY VALUE OUTSIDE PROTECTED AREAS.

Potential environmental impacts are analysed in detail in the environmental impact studies of the projects. Additionally feasible alternatives are assessed and preventive, corrective and compensation measures are determined.

The company has defined general procedures in its Environmental Management System to prevent, correct or compensate impacts in the environment. In addition, efforts are intensified with specific monitoring procedures in the small number of sites located inside or close to protected areas.

EU13 – BIODIVERSITY OF OFFSET HABITATS COMPARED TO THE BIODIVERSITY OF THE AFFECTED AREAS.

n the small number of sites located inside or close to protected areas, we intensify our efforts with specific monitoring procedures, as defined in our Environmental Management System.

EN13 – HABITATS PROTECTED OR RESTORED.

After the construction period, it is our duty to return the site to its initial state. Therefore, we perform morphological restoration and reseeding works. In 2013, 57 ha of affected land were restored.

EDPR has been collaborating for the past years with the Natural Heritage Foundation of Castilla y León (Spain). As part of the activities financed we highlight the environmental restoration of an area heavily impacted by a public motorway in the Burgos province of Spain. The restoration project created a wetland system that provides shelter and food for migratory birds crossing the Iberian Peninsula. Long fly routes without intermediate rest areas is one of the main causes of stress for migratory birds crossing the central dry regions of Spain.

The restored area also provides a habitat for numerous amphibians and reptile species and has benefited surrounding populations by recovering the landscape, designing flood control systems, implementing noise insulation from the motorway, among other benefits.

The collaboration of EDPR with the Natural Heritage Foundation of Castilla y León has also included other projects, such as:

  • The restoration of various natural ponds in Carcedo de Burgos.
  • Construction of a visitor’s centre in Aliseda de Tormes.
  • Adaptation of the pathways at the “Lagunas glaciares de Neila” natural park and signposts showing regulations for public use.
  • Monitoring of the Dupont’s Lark in the area of Medinaceli.
  • Monitoring, preservation and improvement of the habitats of the Black Stork, the Cinereous Vulture, the Spanish Imperial Eagle and other birds of prey in the province of Ávila.